Award-winning, student-run, weekly campus newspaper of the University of Illinois, Springfield

The Observer

Award-winning, student-run, weekly campus newspaper of the University of Illinois, Springfield

The Observer

Award-winning, student-run, weekly campus newspaper of the University of Illinois, Springfield

The Observer

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The dos and don’ts of football food

The Sunday tradition of sitting in front of the big screen and watching your favorite receiver score that touchdown has a few food essentials.

“Chili is what I associate football with most. Growing up we had lots of church functions. After we were done, the congregation would go down to fellowship hall eat chili and watch the bears,” Doug Graham, a Public Affairs graduate student explained.

Graham says that being from Chicago; he can’t ever remember a time watching football, that didn’t involve some form of really good chili. “I don’t remember what the recipe was ,but a fun one was called Dinosaur chili; because they would never say  how many different kinds of meat was in it,” Graham laughed.

While some UIS students stick with beans and cheese, some family traditions go straight for the good stuff, hot wings. Of course, there are only two brands to stick with Buffalo Wild Wings or Dominos and using store bough sauce will not do.

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Condiments always include, Kraft Blue Cheese dressing, mini carrots, and Lays potato chips.

University of Southern California’s Digital Blog Neon Tommy has strong suggestions for game day food essentials.

Always bring something crunchy to relieve the stress of the game, like Chex Mix, Doritos, and Gold Fish. Chex Mix provides the right variety of crunch to relieve any anxiety over the rival team scoring that third touchdown.

Bagel Hot Dogs or Pigs in a Blanket are always a must, because man cannot live on chips alone.

Last, drinks must include three different types’ water, soda, and beer (provided you are old enough to consume this last one). The soda can get more complex, because a party provider should buy both diet and regular soda.

There always differences with football food musts, when it comes to tailgating.  The soda tends to get left out of the cooler and more emphasis on red meat is propriety.

While munching on a steaming pile of cheesy nachos, Public Affairs graduate student, Zach Buchheit, always likes to consume a cold beverage and has a few football food no-no’s. “There should be no fruit, vegetables, really just high calorie, and high content food. Food that you should not eat on a regular basis, just on football game days,” Buchheit said.

At the end of game day, your visitors should feel satisfied and relaxed; depending on whether your team won.

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